Tampa Bay Rhythmics

Rhythmic Gymnastics Basics

  • Ribbon

    The ribbon is 4.5-6 meters long, depending on the age of the gymnast. The ribbon is attached to a stick made of plastic or fiberglass. The ribbon must be in constant motion showing different patterns, such as spirals, snakes and figure 8”s. The ribbon is also tossed in the air and on the floor. Turns are the technical movement of this apparatus.

  • Hoop

    The hoop is similar to a hula hoop, but there are no beads inside and the gymnast decorates it with colored tape to match their leotard. The hoop can be circled, rolled, spun and tossed. A gymnast can pass over or through the hoop. A typical movement is the “boomerang” which is a move that rolls the hoop forward and with a snap of the wrist makes it roll back to the gymnast.

  • Ball

    In the ball exercise, gymnasts roll, throw, bounce, catch and trap the ball. The ball is made of rubber or plastic and comes in various sizes and colors. The gymnast must not “grip” the ball, but instead must show balance and control and a fluid movement of the ball. The ball moves in harmony with the gymnast and should appear to be an extension of the body

  • Clubs

    The clubs are made of plastic or rubber. Gymnasts swing, throw, catch , circle, tap and trap the pair of clubs. Both clubs must be in constant motion. Since there are two clubs, the gymnast must be equally proficient with the right and left hand. Balances are the most common body element with the clubs.

  • Rope

    The rope is proportionate in length to the gymnast’s height and is knotted at each end. Typical movements are swings, circles, figure-8’s, releases, wrapping around a part of the body, tosses and jumps through the rope-which is the technical requirement for this apparatus.

Competitions

Any gymnast who wishes to participate in competitions must be part of the Tampa Bay Rhythmics Team. Being on the competitive team is strictly optional and is by invitation only. Of course being on the team carries additional responsibilities, costs and commitment, but it also brings lots of rewards including, the excitement of competition, fun being around your friends, goal achievement and self confidence. There are several grading periods during the year where a gymnast can become part of the team.

Gymnastic Levels

Gymnasts are placed in competitive levels according to age, skill, interest, and commitment. Progression to the next competitive level is at the discretion of their coaches. TBR coaches are committed to determining the best level for each gymnast at each stage of her development in the sport. A gymnast will not advance just to move her along or because others in her level have advanced. The ultimate goal of TBR coaches is for each gymnast to reach her full potential in rhythmic and to love and enjoy the sport for a lifetime. In a competition, each level is broken up into age groups, these groups are determined by your daughter's birth year. Other then she must be at least 6 years old at the date of the competition, besides that your childs age at the competition doesn't matter. If she was born in say 2005, then that is her division. Here is the divisional Age Chart.

Level 3

• Athletes compete in floor (RFX) and 2 optional apparatus routines. It’s all about skill development, not score, in this, the first “evaluation” level of the sport
• Up to 4 gymnasts (from the same club) may compete on the carpet at the same time.
• Level 3 competes only at local and invitational meets. They may “perform”, but not compete at state meets.

Level 4

• Athletes compete in floor (RFX) and 2 optional apparatus routines.
• Two gymnasts (from the same club) may compete on the carpet at the same time. Usually determined be the size of the meet and the number of level 4 athletes.
• Gymnasts compete in local, state, and regional meets.
• To compete at the regional level, a gymnast must perform all components of all around (AA, comprised of RFX and 2 apparatus routines) and earn a qualifying score at the Florida state meet.

Level 5 & 6

• Level 5 athletes and above always compete on the carpet alone.
• Athletes compete in floor (RFX) and 3 optional apparatus routines.
• The apparatus each level competes with is governed by USAG, and changes yearly. Here is the current rotation Apparatus Chart
• If an athlete chooses to compete fewer than 4 routines, one of them must be floor (RFX)
• Gymnast compete in local, State, Regional and national championship competitions.
• To compete at the Regional and National Championships meet, gymnasts must perform all around (AA) and earn a qualifying score at the designated qualifying meet. Regional qualification is made at State meets; National Championship qualification is made at Regionals.

Level 7 & 8

• Athletes compete in floor (RFX) and 3 optional apparatus routines.
• Any athlete may compete in fewer than 4 routines, but one of them must be RFX.
• Gymnasts compete in local, State, Regional and championship competitions.
• To compete at the Regional and Junior Olympics meets, gymnasts perform in all components of the all around (AA) and earn a qualifying score at the designated qualifying meet. Regional qualification is made at State meets; JO Championships qualification is made at Regionals.

Level 9 & 10

• These levels are governed by rules and policies established by FIG
• L9, L10 & Elite athletes may compete in any local, State or Regional competition.
• L9 athletes must qualify to the USA National Qualifying competition by competing at Level 9 Classic competition.
• L10 & Elite athletes may qualify to the USA National Championships at the USA National Qualifying competition.
• L10 athletes compete at the USA National Championships to determine the US National team.